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was crossed. at thisote without point having all the facts there me, that we know syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. inknow that there are those the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons, if necessary, to protect themselves. of anyeply skeptical claim that, in fact, it was the opposition that use chemical weapons. everybody who knows the facts of chemical weapons stockpile inside syria as well as the syrian government could abilities, i think would question those claims. i know they are floating out there right now. point is, once we establish the facts, i have made clear the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. host: in the newspaper this morning, and israel -- this is from a cnn interview -- host: i want to get your reaction and your thoughts on u.s. policy towards syria. the numbers are on your screen -- host: you can also post a comment on facebook or send a twitter. you can send an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. the washington post, obama warns syria on chemical arms -- host: the british-based syrian obse
the deficit? paul ryan says no. >> at least budgets are passing around here for a change. the government's going to have to learn to do more with less, it's not the government's money, it's the people's money. >> the senate democrats are considering a number of balances ever-- >> and house committee chair paul ryan telling us republicans and democrats are still world's apart. well, that is an understatement. we saw that just an hour ago. the democratic-led senate defeating the ryan house budget 40-59. so is there any hope left? here is congressman paul ryan. >> great to see you. >> great it to see you again. >> greta: i want to talk about the budget that passed today, i imagine you're happy. >> we're very happy. we passed a balanced budget and it's important we owe the country a reasonable plan and grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a statistical exercise it's the necessary means to a healthier economy, it creates more jobs and helps people keep more of hard earned money and a contrast to the other budgets that are passing. at least budgets are passing here for a change,
government that any powerful weapon will be secured and destroyed. tois our response ability determine whether this can be done that ensures arms will not fall into terrorist organizations. i'm encouraged the syrian opposition chose the prime minister for exile yesterday. time is of the essence. there are difficult decisions that must be made in the days and weeks ahead. we continue to push for un security council resolution. do we provide military advisers and training? do we provide direct military assistance? if so, what kind? can assad be pushed to accept any negotiated conflict? the use of chemical weapons -- makes this more pressing. the use of chemical weapons by this regime would be horrific. 70,000 slaughtered syrians is terrific. horrific. the discussions we have in this committee are interesting. the fact that this is hard cannot stop us from acting. you and your colleagues know better than anyone there are no easy answers. inaction is not an option. i look forward to your testimony and i yield back. thank you. >> thank you. three minutes to the chairman of the middle east s
control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. we will look at iraq today and where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. all on the who they are.-- know who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el sity. sal.-- yale univer he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
of government, government-run pensions, the unionized government work force and bobby jindal with school choice. he's planning this year to abolish the corporate and individual income tax, moving in a very different direction than the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. so there's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxe
putting members on the government payroll. little traction has gained despite high-profile controversies. as i mentioned earlier, a saide ago, jesse jackson kim my wife's company work for the campaign? opinion was that yes, she can, unless -- as long as certain things are met. we know jesse jackson pled guilty to misusing thousands of dollars in campaign funds for personal use. he clearly lost -- crossed the line. i think people are starting to think, maybe we should once again revisit what is happening, where is the line was -- with personal use? a few years earlier, there was a lot of scrutiny when the california sensitive -- , his wife'sve company was getting a 50% commission for his campaign. .- 15% commission people got caught up in the larger investigation into the lobbying scandal. he was never formally charged with wrongdoing, but that was an episode where people said earning commissions, is that appropriate? ?ost: what was the end result guest: nothing has changed. it is still legal. the whole compensation system is determined by the member of congress and his employees. or her
with the whole family planning bill that was printed but not adopted but gradually the irish government did take responsibility nine years later with the measure and now that is of course, the controversial at all. meanwhile i was enjoying teaching law and a loved the interaction and i was practicing law and because of the opportunity to discuss tonight is state's constitutional law i quickly decided that was the area i wanted to focus on to take the test cases there issues of equality i would take them in the irish courts then there was the possibility these cases could be taken beyond the irish court just as the high court or supreme court because ireland had ratified the european convention on human rights and fundamental freedoms and all of that meant you could take decades having exhausted the remedies to go direct to strasbourg and the other possibility was to take cases to join the european union were there were directive said equal pay and equal opportunity binding on ireland there be a reference to go to luxembourg and argue then get a ruling because the irish court would be bound to ap
-american? >> guest: no, at the moment we have an ongoing dispute with the reigning government, which itself produces all manner of vicious propaganda against the united states or at about the great and so forth. so are actually quite popular. they are among the most pro-american populations in the greater middle east that it's unusual to find -- pollsters have not been able to find populations filled in any country. you find the rise and fall of approval of u.s. policies, which can sometimes the rep to demonstration where the two disputes between governments that we then throw into this catchall category as to what the problem is this underlying hatred. even though public opinion changes radically month-to-month in year-to-year. germans arrest about their opinion of the u.s. president under george w. bush it fell to a low of 12% approval. within a couple years obama with the day. approval was 92%. it's people who can make discriminating judgment on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country and many western europeans in many places were unhappy with an inarticulate proponent of
, you know, the federal government and the banks don't want you to save money, because the banks can get their money from the fed for 0% so why would they let people save money. they would dread you put the money in the stock market and take a chance you're going to gain or lose. it's against a person wanting to save money. host: when did you start saving? caller: i'd say about 20 years before i retired. host: and you retired at what age? caller: 59. old enough to start drawing my 401-k. host: so the company you work for provided a 401-k? that's when you started investing? caller: yes, but you know they didn't match anything. what i put in there was my money but we had profit sharing. but they never matched what i put in. it was my money. host: do you think that -- did you ever use a financial advisor? caller: no. i got my money in chase, managed accounts, they managed my money. before it was through fidelity, and i could manipulate it myself, and that's when i lost half my money, because i didn't move it fast enough, and i took a big hit. host: so you didn't take it out of riskiers a cr
of the state legislatures, governor's mansions, and there's a difference between state government and the federal government. the absurdity in a state capital, that we did not have a budget for three years, yet here in washington the senate did not pass a budget for three years and the president just not serious about what americans think is the biggest problem of that country. they do not even have a budget for three years? state government, closer to the people, has to get things done. i used to tell trent lott, the difference between governors and senators is senators talk about doing things and governors do things. there's a lot of truth to democrat governors as well. their party is so committed to washington that you do not see many of these governors who are willing to talk the way republican governors are about how we do a better job at the state level. there's much more bipartisanship. i like to think i had a relative success will governorship, but eight of my eight years of governor, i have a democrat house majority, and seven of my years, i had a democrat senate majority
reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >> all right. check it out. because punxsutawney phil is a wanted animal. an ohio prosecutor is not happy with the famed groundhog's prediction of an early spring. like much of the northwest and mideast it's frigid in the buckeye state and the prosecutor says he wants the ultimate, the death penalty. >> it's definitely not spring, it's a snowstorm and temperatures in the teens and when i came to work in the wind and the cold, i said to myself something's wrong with phil, you know? punxsutawney has some answers he has to give. i'm going to indict phil and taking the death penalty because let's face it phil is already behind bars with a life sentence. what else is left? >> before you write to complain, the prosecutor admits he has fun and the story has legs. here is a copy of the of
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general control of the government presentation to the supreme court. the petitions to file, what responses to file, oral argument in the solicitor general also decides in the government will appeal an adverse decisions by district court or the court of appeals. the solicitor general has authority to decide when a federal they meet the eye and the supreme court or court of appeals. it's a broad portfolio that requires a large base of knowledge plus the ability to learn fast. the solicitor general does not control with y and doesn't start the process within the justice department feared cases that a writer for out to litigating division civil, criminal and thÉrÈse, and grants a natural resource and environment. then make recommendations, which go to the assistance. sometimes there's an internal conflict. the department of justice include the criminal division and those people always want to defend guards and seized their presence. sublimates divisions tends to favor and somebody has to resolve those on assistant to the solicitor general may think the criminal division statutory. prosecutio
to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here
. his government has been blamed for a lot. the country has become a bit of a tax haven for rich russians. some banks, we are told now, will reopen on tuesday, but restrictions will be in place. there was real fear there will be a run on those banks when they do reopen and in fact, we have just learned that the two biggest and most troubled banks will not reopen tomorrow. we're told now they won't open again until thursday. what is the u.s. take away from all this, megyn? >> europe, the ally, and trading partner for the united states, certainly, is intact. that's a good thing. but according to experts, the credibility of the euro shall the credibility of the european union has been damaged by all of this back and forth for the past couple of days. as you noted, a very dangerous precedent has been set, that is dipping into private bank accounts to pay for the government, and maybe that's why we see the markets both here and in the states go down today. >> megyn: greg palkot, thank you. it's not often that the economy in cyprus makes global headlines, but experts say the latest and
the russian government hazardous to your health? the mysterious death of a one-time billionaire. and the pop culture lead. the white house blowing up, commander in chief held at gun point. where is hollywood obsessed at putting the president in peril. ? we start, of course, with our national lead. for years we've watched court cases that were always destined to end up before the u.s. supreme court, setting precedents that will determine once and for all whether, in the u.s., gay and lesbian couples can legally marry. and now the time is here. the cases have arrived. tomorrow the nine justices will hear arguments over california's proposition 8, the law that voters passed in 2008 banning same-sex marriage in california. and on wednesday the court will hear a separate case challenging the defense of marriage act, which defined marriage as between one man and one woman. signed into law in 1996 by president clinton who now supports the overturning of that law. at least one of the nine on the court has a personal connection to this issue, chief justice john roberts has a cousin from san francisco
how government raises and spends money. >> wow. >> just 19% support the way congressional republicans are dealing with it. and it was nearly split. 47% sided with the president, 46% sided with republicans, and i wonder, joe, if this is at least inspiration enough for them to just get a deal. is anyone going to get worse than this? really? why can't they at least get something done. >>> i think politically the pressure is more on the president for this reason. you go -- you ask somebody -- it's kind of like lawyers. i found that everybody hated lawyers, right? >> yep. everybody loves their own lawyer. you should have seen what she did in court. man, let me give you my lawyer's number. it's the same thing with congressmen. everybody hates congressmen, but hey, my guy, my woman, they go up there and boy they fight. so, again, you've got to put yourself in the position of a congressman looking at 31% approval rating going, yeah, that's fine. i'm saying that 74%, the words of dire straits, you know, i got a daytime job, i'm doing all right. i think the pressure when you look at these numbe
an ongoing dispute with the iran and the iranian government that has propaganda against united states but we're actually quite popular with the iranian state are the most pro-american population of the greater middle east. it is unusual to find and pollsters have not found populations that are filled with haters of america but what you do find is the rise and fall of approval of u.s. policies which could be a interrupted of demonstrations that we throw into the catchall of anti-americanism as what the problem is the underlying hatred even though public opinion changes radically from month to month the year-to-year germans were asked about their opinions of u.s. presidency george to view bush fell to the low of coal% but obama was elected and approval was 92% was that a population of haters? no. they to make discriminating judgments on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country so western europeans were unhappy with the leader they saw as an inarticulate proponent of unilateral action and who had a swagger in his step and not interested in their opinion and when the presi
taxpayer dollars funded that video. this, of course, weeks after another government agency, this time, the usda had a video teaching college kids how to use a microwave. since the sequester, washington agentedded like a 2-year-old throwing temper tantrums making big spectacle cuts. looking like stopping the federal government from spending money is harder than keeping the snow from falling. cut out the spending on junk. that's my two cents more. that's all for tonight's "wig liz report," and thank you for watching. if you can't catch us live, don't forget to dvr the show. have a great night. ♪ lou: the tie any island nation of cypress is safe for now. the last effort to bail out and save its economy, but the solution that has bank depositors and investors everywhere now nervous. the largest banks are taking up to 40% of all bank deposits more than 100,000 euros or $129,000 or higher leaving smaller deposits untouched. optimism over the deal initially pushed the s&p 500 to within a point of its all time high of 1565 in early trading. stocks told off the cypress bailout is a template
the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activism. that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that we now spend three fourths of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30 and it used to be we spent three for some people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not in terms of generational warfare but i think we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements by the way. this is not a generation that has and he believes the government going to give them out money. >> host: the activism you talked about from the baby boo
the library had been run privately and the federal government had kept all of president nixon's papers in washington, one of the outcomes of watergate, and my job was to bring it together and have a federally funded and administered library in california with the papers. so we started this oral history project 30 years late. and after all, it's much better when you get people when they're just out of the administration. and another since talking years later the time to, and may be more candid. the really, really older gentleman of the entity for the library had been with richard nixon in the '60s. you just mentioned something about him pushing him out. without exception, the men who had been with them in the '50s, he pushed away when he got to the white house. and he brought close to him younger people. he enjoyed having of the people around, but younger people he could mold and shape. and a lot of the trouble that arose was that these younger people were willing to do what he wanted them to do. whereas the older people and the numbers we interviewed wanted, kept saying no, don't do th
, but maybe he wants to us think he just might. that question was never posein the u.s. government or the cia, despite very smart people theyci have there. >> rose: then they launched thele invasion, and was immediately successful.an saddam went into hiding.dd what happened in the days after that, that made, for most of us looking at it, and for most analysts-- and you included -- serious mistakes?ys >> well, i was there for that part-- this enterprise as an embedded correspondent, both in the command and on the ground.on and the expectation was-- theth americans essentially fought last war. they fought the 2003 war as if it was an extension of the 1991x war. they thought you defeat the republican guard pup go to-- you defeat kind of the conventionali forces. and then war is done, and we're finish people say there wasn't a plan. there was a plan. it was to hand over as quicklyan as possible to the iraqis themselves to take out driver, put in some new drivers into the vehicle, and let it go down the road. >> rose: that was rumsfeld's theory. >> it was also condi rice's. the institution would h
viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstart movements. think all that was incredibly important. the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produced, and that -- all of that, we're seeing that play out today. whether it's the election of barack barack obama or continued advancement of women in congress. there's a lot of work left undone, and i think that there's -- we now spend 3/4 of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30. used to be we spent 3/4 on people under the age of 30. it's not a question of generational warfare, but i think we need to have a conversation about how we're dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements. my general has any belief the government is going to give them that money -- >> host: well, the activism you talked about, from the baby-boomer generation, that activism that has trickled down to millenials or do you see them as more politically apathetic? >> guest: i think the activism
be a mushroom cloud. and that's not true. there was relationship between the iraqi government and the people who attacked us on 9/11. and yet, there's the republican presidential nominee, the last one to run, saying actually the iraq war was a war of liberation. at the republican convention this year, when they picked that nominee, the speech was given by the national security adviser during the iraq war, the one who said the smoking gun would be a mushroom cloud, who described that war in her speech that night at the convention as a hard hard decision to keep us from being attacked again. ten years later it is hard to come to terms with the fact we went to war based on something the president told us that was not true. there is nothing that can bring back the more than 4400 american troops who died in that war, the more than 30,000 american troops wounded will not be made whole. we cannot bring them back. we cannot heal their injuries retroactively. and george bush and dick cheney and condoleezza rice are still around. in terms of how we get right with this as a country, the accountability can'
government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus on dr. king and i have a dream. and i know that -- we all know this and most of us can recite parts of it and chunks of it especially towards the end. it's a great speech. it's optimistic, hopeful, it is king at his best when it comes to the delivery and the style and emotional appeal but also frees as dr. king in 1963 in this moment. he's talking about ecology and the brotherhood, which are fine themes and messages but it freezes him and obscures' the complexity of king and of the freedom struggle and the complexity of the 1960's. so tonight i want to talk more about another march, the poor people's campaign in 1968 which is what dr. king was working on when he was assassinated in memphis. alarmed by what he saw as a vicious circle of violence by the state with police harassment and brutality or as well u.s. military involvement in southeast asia and then the response by frustrated african-americans and very frustrated at the slow pace
, because people were looking back to nixon saying you can have a good government republic that once the government of the efficient. although under mix and it did grow. the the republican party is so different now because there is no room for nixon so there was much more interesting richard nixon's domestic agenda. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he h
the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >> do you like eggs? >> doesn't everybody. >> the scrambled eggs and people fgather on the first day of swing and restaurants compete who can make the biggest portion and a record to the team cooked 1500 eggs in one gigantic pan. >> why? >> they're a symbol of a new beginning for spring. >> looks pretty good. >> thanks for joining us. >> "america live" starts right now. >> megyn: fox news alert just 48 hours after an assassination style hit on a high ranking state official in colorado, investigators are looking into whether a powerful saudi arabian family is in in way tied to the murder. tom clements was director of colorado department of corrections. as the manhunt for his killer began, who could have carried this out. welcome, i'm megyn kelly. investigators working on several th
understood why the government would come in the philippines, would utilize that approach to resolve this conflict. because after all, efforts have been made to reach an agreement to come to a mutually beneficial agreement. and that had failed. and, therefore, the ability to petition and to have a resolution of this through that method was logical. and i think that the resolution of these disputes have become by nature of using the rule of law. and that dispute mechanism resolution that exists under the treaty is an effective way, as i'm explaining to this you -- explained to the now, and effective way to address this problem. because our goal and our diplomacy is based on urging governance, not just the type of nationalist rhetoric that leads to confrontation. but instead, to work multinationally and order to resolve disputes. we can see periods in the past when nations with competing claims came very close to resolution, and, unfortunately, because of nationalist voices, in both countries, we failed to achieve that opportunity to resolve a situation. and that's what i think the uni
. overseas, a the love federal government, legal questions. she was fbled by republicans for two and a half years. the president spoke out on that amidst all the other busy stuff he was doing on foreign policy this week. and he said even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continued to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination. the d.c. circuit has more vacancies than any other appeals court. yet we know this doesn't get a lot of attention. do you think there is any. >> to put more pressure on this do nothing congress? >> it is unlikely she will come back up. what is happening here is that this is part of the conservative cause on judicial nominations. they're made about what happened during the bush years when democrats blocked a landful of very conservative judicial nominees. in some respects, this might be payback. what could obama do? he can try another couple of judicial nominations. the bottom line is he needs to clear these judicial nominations with at least a handful of republicans. otherwise if they're too liberal, they will get filibustered. >> thank y
re-elected. it certainly helped persuade the israeli government to come up with a coalition agreement so that their act would be together to greet him. i think it's going to be really interesting to see what he says tomorrow to the people because that is how the obama administration is framing this trip. not as a diplomatic coup, but really as a person-to-person mission. israelis just don't know him. you know-- >> john: especially netanyahu's brother, apparently, who said some very unkind things about the president's stand toward israel. >> well, i think there is suspicion. much of that is based on because there has not been that much of this kind of contact. in 2009 the president went to kay row and gave an amazing speech there and traveled the middle east, but many israelis felt neglected. now he's taking care of that. >> and we know the palestinians feel neglected as well. maysoon let me ask you. we all have high hopes where the president hopes to reignite talk of a two-state solution. but give the amount of settlements has a two-state solution just become a pipe dream. >> first of
is a statement of each party's vision in how they would govern. >> i you think our budge is rooted in math and shared common american values. the republican budget relies on magic and doesn't add up. >> a lot of democrats in washington they don't care about balancing the budget anymore. it certainly shows with this one. >> there is a lot of talk about balancing budgets. i was here when we did that. we know how to do this. we've done it before. republicans don't know how to do it. >> i argue they have zero credibility on this. >> let's be clear. democrats in this town who reject the goal of balancing the budget is how of step where the american people are. >> the amazing race, question on this after they travel to hanoi and vietnam. >> now they make their way to the b-52 memorial, site of wreckage of b-52 bomber shot down during the vietnam war. >> four americans went down with that plane. two died. four were in prison. 850,000 vietnam veterans alive today and you owe them a big apology. >> you guys better apologize. had you had no comment on something as trajz as that. i'll tell you, cbs w
government. and is somewhat weakened after a tough re-election fight. so from the white house perspective, he comes, the president comes here at a pretty good time to try to reach out to the israeli people. try to let them believe that he really does care about israel. that he has their back. they've been very much supported by the united states militarily. the iron dome missile defense system. but for some reason israeli people, perhaps because of the president's 2009 speech in cairo. there is a feeling in israel that he has not shown them the love. so he's going to try to do that on this trip. he's going to go to the historic founder of israel, the hertzel monument. to show that he doesn't believe that israel's roots began only after the holocaust. and that he agrees with israel's timeline that it goes back to millennium. he's going to see the dead sea skrols. he'll pay homage to israel's deep rots and go to the west bank, go to ramallah and speak with the leader of the palestinians, try to get more of a warmer relationship. then they're talking about iran. and iran is front and center. he
their wages and trusted in their government that they would be taken care of. medicare is the most efficient health plan in our country. it has a 2% overhead. let me repeat that. it's a 2% overhead, more efficient than any private plan. the problem isn't medicare. the problem is the rising cost of health care. and what is it that we have to get under control? it's a cost that's gone up exponentially in our country compared to the rest of the world. republicans want to do nothing about the real problem of rising costs. rather than tackle the hard issue, they want to shift the costs onto seniors. people like my mom. she's 96 right now, and she depends on that important program. six years ago she had to be checked up for a heart condition, and she had an an rism below her die -- an uerism below her diaphragm. they said it would be difficult to solve, not get a stint because of her age, and she was 70. well, a few years later that anyeurism became larger and was told if nothing was done she would die and the doctors looked at her again and noticed that at the advanced age of 90 she walked around
time the beginning of the lunar new year. for the first time our government is headed up by asian-americans. our mayor and our judicial officer, judge lee and our board of supervisors. in fact we have so many asian-americans we are often confused for each other. eric mar and i am confused of each other. and because of their moustache, norman lee and our mayor. this is an amazing week for sports. during the past week we had the asian-american basketball star, jeremy lin come to the bay area. and our giants are starting spring training. i think that is auspicious. but as our mayor said, we have had so many gains we have made. but we know we have a lot of work to do. we just built an amazing chinatown conference and we have to be sure that we remain solvent. we are a city of immigrants. and we know that nationally we are having a debate. we need to be sure that reform happens. i know that every elected official and those who work for the city and county of san francisco, want to be sure that our asian seniors and our asian kids and families are taken care of. i want to thank all of y
with criminals more in debt a decade from now. it's true. the government is still growing no, matter what we do now. you don't hear that, of course, because it's not flashy or exciting or bloody. it doesn't sound exciting that paul ryan is slowing the pace of government. but paul ryan forcing millions to go on food stamps or pushing granny off a cliff -- i just heard this one. he is actually killing thousands of seniors. that is wrong. so i know. that the club. there is nothing wrong with having a point of view but everything wrong not bringing up all the point of view. it takes two parties to tango. so you can't just blame one. or one side is stubborn or jeopardizes a deal but the other is not when it jeopardizes the same deal because it opposes spending cuts. i know i keep pounding this, again and again. a lot of you seem to think it gets old. the only reason i do so, day in and day out is to remind everyone that it is through the prism of the media that we get a sense of what is going on. my fear is what is not going on. what is reported poorly. we have ware of the media that gloms on to the
authorities could appeal to the u.s. government for her extradition. if the acquittal is upheld, it's case over. a native of the ivory coast who was raised is serving a 16-year prison term for kercher's murder. >> ben wedeman joins us live from rome. curious what the prosecution's argument is for wanting to do this, to retry her. >> well, the prosecution objected to the whole verdict of the appellate court in 2011. their argument is they found dna evidence from amanda knox on the alleged murder weapon, a kitchen knife. however, the defense argued that there was no dna from either amanda knox or raffaele, her former boyfriend, in the room where meredith's body was found. at this point we understand the defense is continuing to present their case inside the italian supreme court behind me. but we're also hearing from some lawyers that this hearing is taking much longer than was expected. some are suggesting we may not hear whether the court will uphold the acquittal until possibly tomorrow. >> ben, what about amanda knox? we know she's not in italy during the hearing. but have we heard anyth
in north richmond and bringing their own weapons and saying we're going to create our own governance. so this puts the whole party on a different scale. pause now this is seen as a -- because now this is seen as a threat. what happens is the state says, okay, we can't have that, we're going to change the gun laws and restrict the right to bear arms. and interestingly, the nra in this period is in favor of restrictions on second amendment, and, um, ronald reagan and the assembly pushed true this legislation -- through this legislation to restrict the right to bear arms and make this initial strategy of policing the police that had built political power, um, the panthers had used to build political power impossible. but this really, this puts the party on the map. chairman seale and a delegation of panthers go to the assembly and protest this legislation. they go armed. this is before the law is passed. and newspapers all over the country, all over the world all of a sudden know about the black panther party. this is huey newton and the wicker throne. i'm not going to have time to talk in
career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's no break through. i think it is a big deal that john boehner and others can't uphold this that the debt crisis is coming now or soon. if you go through what he said further, he said it is looming and coming. this is always the thing, with this spring of deficit hawk, there's always in some future the great crisis we need to fear. those that have said have been wrong, two years ago was supposed to be then. at least they're backing off it being so soon. that's eroding the underlying nature of the argument. >> does this help explain why they're doing nothing, the debt isn't a big deal? >> they a sequester, what more do they need. >
before. the american government lied to its own people. honestly, i don't know of a worse lie one could tell other than a lie to take a country to war, to make up things, to take people to war. that's got to be the most obscene, immoral thing to do, so -- so this government hasn't earned the right to be trusted. if it says assad has chemical weapons, or if it says ahmadinejad has a nuclear weapon -- >> but it's not this government, is it, that went to war with saddam? you have to differentiate. >> which government. you're talking obama versus bush. >> i'm talking about the real government, wall street, the banks, the corporations that made $2 trillion is what we spent on the iraq war. who made that money? soldiers in the field? no, i don't think so. this is always about the people who have the purse strings and the politicians who are bought off by them, and so if they come on now and tell me anything about this, you know, ahmadinejad is building a bomb, really? well, i'll believe it, you know, when he walks in a room with it and shows it to me. frankly that's really how much i would no
about destabilizing jordan and giving us maybe an advantage in iran if the syrian government changes and the fallout with israel. i think the long-term issue is do we have values that want to prevent this kind of thing? after all, europe finally did it and we were with them in bosnia. we didn't do it in rwanda. we did act in libya which has less strategic interest for us than this. i think there is no choice any more. i was very cautious for a long time and applauded obama for being cautious, but now we have reached the tipping point. >> we will come back to this. we have a lot of other news to cover as well. >>> first leg of mark sanford's shot at political redemption is complete. he easily clenched a spot in the runoff for the charleston area congressional seat. what is still unclear who his opponent will be. following thin voter turnout, bostic and grooms separated less than 1%. now sanford will try to cobble together support for those who voted for other candidates in what was a packed field flanked by his sons, sanford invoked the importance of putting the country's financial ho
-local veterans version of 4 square, but requires cooperation from the federal and state government, which has turned out to be tremendously cumbersome. at the root of this issue a transition our three core tenants. our group can provide all three a new and exciting mission. create newmpting to offline communities through an innovative tool. thank you for your time. >> thank you very much. thee is a team leader of veterans outreach program. >> chairman sanders, members of your committee, thank you for this invitation to discuss the vermont veterans outreach program. time there my team has conducted assessment surveys of over 4200 veterans to discuss the needs -- their needs and the needs of their families. it has evolved and expanded beyond its original mandate. we now also assist service members through wartime conflicts. one of the reasons the outreach program has been so successful is the grass roots slighting their feet under the kitchen tables way of doing business. we will go to the home of the veteran and work with them to find what they really need. the issues raised through health car
a few years ago said your whole government is robbing you. people should know, listen, there's a lost factors that go into your gas prices not just the mean oil prices and those guys overseas that hate us. sometimes it is your local representative looking for more money. >>steve: are you doing the stuart show today? >> i'm going to be on later today and the rest of the week i'm going to host it. a lot of things to talk about, cyprus. the stock market has been rockin' and rollin' too. >>gretchen: coming up on "fox & friends," it is your heart calling. you're about to have a heart attack? how your phone can tell you you're about to keel over. that's coming up next. >>steve: i hope the phone isn't busy. anna kooiman reaching new heights this morning. hrao at that. she's live somewhere. hey, anna. >> good morning to you, steve. good morning to everybody at home. we are at brooklyn boulders, the largest climbing facility in new york city. we're visiting with disabled climbers today. there's been about a hundred that have gone through here. they have all sorts of disabilities, anything from
in 2011. >> no federal government employees, including counterterrorism agents, in the fbi, for example, no border agents. now, before we default, we could have time to make this sign for all points of entry. that's just the tip of the iceberg. >> i think he was being sarcastic, don't you? >>> now to the ones who were ill advised for whatever reason. first iowa republican congressman steve king with the solution for illegal immigration in the form of a construction project on the house floor. >> you can't shut that off unless we build a fence and wall. i want to put a fence in and a wall in. i designed one. this would be an example, then, of how that wall would look. you can also deconstruct it the same way. you can take it back down. i also say we need to do a few other things on top of that wall. one of them put a little bit of wire on top to provide a disincentive for people to climb over top or put a ladder there. we can electrify this wire, not a current that would kill anybody, but would be a deterrent. we do it in livestock all the time. >> now for one that made the loser list. i
are getting welfare, who are getting -- who are getting government benefits, and they don't want that to happen. so i think the white house is certainly pleased with where this is going. you have a bill probably that's going to be introduced next month in april, i think. it's a surprise that we're here. i think it's a surprise that we're talking about immigration. i think it's a surprise that we're still talking about gun control. >> but, you know, margie, reince priebus, the chairman of the rnc, he said yesterday on cnn that romney's anti-immigration comments hurt the party. watch. >> one of the issues that i think really cut pretty badly within the hispanic community is when mitt romney talked about self-deportation. and, you know, it's a concept that really doesn't -- it's not our party's position. but it was something that i think hit every hispanic kitchen table across america. >> but i just want to tell you that he's wrong. it is the party's position. because if you read the party's platform, it says -- this is a direct quote from the republican party platform that was vote
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